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Basil Growing Season for New Mexico

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country.

While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors.

The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%.

Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season.

StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing Season
NMBernalillo5/16151
NMCatron7/1259
NMChaves5/28119
NMCibola6/2975
NMColfax6/1796
NMCurry5/13142
NMDe Baca5/20130
NMDona Ana5/24138
NMEddy4/24182
NMGrant5/23152
NMGuadalupe5/16136
NMHarding5/29119
NMHidalgo5/23150
NMLea4/29175
NMLincoln7/0661
NMLos Alamos6/05111
NMLuna4/30174
NMMckinley6/2191
NMMora6/1890
NMOtero5/23134
NMQuay5/16135
NMRio Arriba5/31122
NMRoosevelt5/18132
NMSan Juan6/2878
NMSan Miguel5/08156
NMSandoval7/2711
NMSanta Fe6/12100
NMSierra5/21151
NMSocorro5/27128
NMTaos6/1987
NMTorrance6/03113
NMUnion5/17133
NMValencia6/2975