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Basil Growing Season for Utah

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country.

While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors.

The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%.

Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season.

StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing Season
UTBeaver6/2779
UTBox Elder7/1236
UTCache6/2863
UTDaggett6/2663
UTDavis6/03111
UTDuchesne6/1984
UTEmery6/04111
UTGarfield7/1433
UTGrand5/16133
UTIron7/1042
UTJuab6/2285
UTKane5/30122
UTMillard7/0461
UTMorgan7/0350
UTPiute7/0358
UTRich7/307
UTSalt Lake7/308
UTSan Juan5/20134
UTSanpete6/2087
UTSevier7/1637
UTSummit7/2126
UTTooele7/2317
UTUintah6/1978
UTUtah6/1596
UTWasatch8/0210
UTWashington5/02170
UTWayne6/02129
UTWeber5/31115