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Basil Growing Season for West Virginia

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country.

While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors.

The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%.

Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season.

StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing Season
WVBarbour6/08108
WVBerkeley5/18133
WVBoone5/30126
WVBraxton5/28125
WVBrooke5/27124
WVCabell5/16142
WVDoddridge6/01120
WVFayette6/01120
WVGilmer5/31122
WVGrant6/1983
WVGreenbrier6/06110
WVHampshire5/30122
WVHancock5/29122
WVHardy6/1098
WVHarrison5/28127
WVJackson5/27122
WVKanawha5/14156
WVLewis5/31120
WVLincoln5/26127
WVLogan5/14149
WVMarion5/31120
WVMarshall5/22134
WVMason5/24131
WVMercer5/22136
WVMonongalia5/27121
WVMonroe6/13101
WVNicholas5/31122
WVPendleton6/1296
WVPocahontas6/11104
WVPreston5/29125
WVRaleigh5/31117
WVRandolph6/1796
WVRoane6/05111
WVSummers5/16146
WVTucker6/06116
WVTyler5/31122
WVUpshur6/06111
WVWayne5/16142
WVWirt5/29123
WVWood5/20139
WVWyoming5/21139