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Basil Growing Season for Alabama

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Alaska

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonAKAleutians East Borough7/0663AKAleutians West7/3018AKAnchorage Borough6/1972AKBethel6/2761AKBristol Bay Borough7/1138AKFairbanks North Star Borough7/2318AKJuneau Borough6/1286AKKenai Peninsula Borough6/3063AKKetchikan Gateway Borough6/02126AKKodiak Island Borough6/2176AKLake And Peninsula Borough7/2219AKMatanuska-Susitna Borough6/2460AKNome7/2518AKNorth Slope BoroughN/ANo growing season for this area.AKPrince Of Wales-Outer Ketchika5/23132AKSitka Borough6/12110AKSkagway-Hoonah-Angoon5/27125AKSoutheast...

Basil Growing Season for Arizona

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonAZApache6/2194AZCochise4/29183AZCoconino7/2223AZGila4/25189AZGraham5/08165AZGreenlee6/05129AZLa Paz3/13256AZMaricopa4/07218AZMohave5/03178AZNavajo6/15105AZPima3/11249AZPinal4/28189AZSanta...

Basil Growing Season for Arkansas

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonARArkansas4/14194ARAshley4/23168ARBaxter4/30158ARBenton5/11142ARBoone4/27167ARBradley4/16187ARCarroll5/01159ARChicot4/15191ARClark4/19174ARClay4/30158ARCleburne4/29169ARColumbia4/19176ARConway4/25164ARCraighead4/21176ARCrittenden4/23173ARCross4/21170ARDallas4/21179ARDesha4/15185ARDrew4/26163ARFaulkner4/22172ARFulton5/14138ARGarland4/18185ARGrant4/26171ARHempstead4/17183ARHot...

Basil Growing Season for California

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonCAAlameda5/14170CAAlpine7/317CAButte5/06165CACalaveras6/2888CAColusa5/05179CAContra Costa5/13185CADel Norte5/21161CAEl Dorado5/30142CAFresno4/13211CAGlenn5/06187CAHumboldt5/15155CAImperial3/08255CAInyo3/08252CAKern4/29189CAKings4/24190CALake5/30133CALassen7/1738CALos Angeles5/21162CAMadera4/22186CAMarin5/16192CAMariposa6/18109CAMendocino5/16170CAMerced5/04166CAModoc6/2869CAMonoN/ANo growing season for this area.CAMonterey7/0682CANapa5/05188CANevada7/1539CAOrange4/05233CAPlacer5/21156CAPlumas7/287CARiverside3/19251CASacramento4/18213CASan Benito6/15112CASan Bernardino3/26230CASan DiegoN/AGrowing season is year-round.CASan FranciscoN/AGrowing season is year-round.CASan Joaquin4/26180CASan Luis Obispo6/08118CASan Mateo2/24294CASanta Barbara3/19276CASanta Clara4/28193CASanta Cruz5/07183CAShastaN/ANo growing season for this...

Basil Growing Season for Colorado

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonCOAdams6/1396COAlamosa7/1441COArapahoe6/1196COBaca5/21122COBent5/25120COBoulder5/31113COChaffee7/2018COCheyenne5/27116COClear Creek8/012COConejos7/1136COCostilla7/0952COCuster7/2219CODelta6/1498CODenver5/27115CODoloresN/ANo growing season for this area.CODouglas6/1688COEl Paso5/30112COFremont6/04115COGarfield6/2477COGrandN/ANo growing season for this area.COGunnison7/313COHinsdale7/2416COHuerfano6/03105COJacksonN/ANo growing season for this area.COJefferson7/1822COKiowa5/29117COKit Carson5/23122COLa Plata7/1154COLake7/286COLarimer5/27118COLas Animas6/03110COLogan5/31110COMesa5/30128COMineralN/ANo growing season for this area.COMoffat6/1886COMontezuma6/14100COMontrose6/10107COMorgan5/20126COOtero5/25121COOuray6/2777COPark7/1242COPhillips5/26114COPitkinN/ANo growing season for this area.COProwers5/22120COPueblo5/26120CORio Blanco6/1983CORio Grande6/3073CORouttN/ANo growing season for this area.COSaguache7/0637COSan JuanN/ANo growing season for this area.COSan Miguel7/2910COSedgwick5/26117COSummitN/ANo growing season for this...

Basil Growing Season for Connecticut

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonCTFairfield5/25126CTHartford5/26125CTLitchfield6/1785CTNew...

Basil Growing Season for Delaware

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonDEKent5/01159DENew...

Basil Growing Season for Florida

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonFLAlachua4/09222FLBaker4/13204FLBrevard3/14283FLBroward2/11338FLCharlotte3/06294FLCitrus4/06222FLCollier2/21309FLColumbia4/10206FLDade2/07338FLDesoto3/23247FLDixie4/15200FLDuval3/12259FLEscambia3/27231FLFranklin3/28236FLGadsden4/13211FLGlades3/05294FLGulf4/08208FLHamilton4/12202FLHardee3/26258FLHendry3/20273FLHernando4/01231FLHighlands4/17228FLHillsborough3/09280FLIndian River3/17290FLJefferson4/15189FLLafayette4/14204FLLake3/15268FLLee2/20313FLLeon4/24184FLLevy4/07209FLMadison4/11207FLManatee3/11276FLMarion4/06213FLMartin3/03310FLMiami-Dade2/07338FLMonroeN/AGrowing season is year-round.FLNassau3/19253FLOkaloosa4/22181FLOkeechobee3/04297FLOsceola3/15275FLPalm Beach3/17279FLPasco3/08271FLPinellas3/15275FLPolk3/13273FLPutnam3/22252FLSanta Rosa4/11208FLSarasota2/28294FLSeminole3/16269FLSt....

Basil Growing Season for Georgia

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonGAAppling4/24177GABacon4/12202GABaldwin4/29171GABanks5/04163GABarrow5/05162GABartow4/28171GABen...

Basil Growing Season for Hawaii

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonHIHawaiiN/AGrowing season is year-round.HIHonoluluN/AGrowing season is year-round.HIKauaiN/AGrowing season is...

Basil Growing Season for Idaho

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonIDAda5/26127IDAdams7/315IDBannock7/0264IDBear Lake6/2961IDBenewah7/0167IDBingham7/1042IDBlaine7/1832IDBoise7/2317IDBonner7/1341IDBonneville7/2420IDBoundary6/1387IDButte7/1048IDCamas7/2712IDCanyon6/09104IDCaribou7/1437IDCassia6/2972IDClark7/0759IDClearwater5/30116IDCuster7/2131IDElmore6/08109IDFranklin6/3050IDFremont7/1634IDGem6/1792IDGooding6/2278IDIdaho6/1888IDJefferson7/2223IDJerome6/2575IDKootenai6/0999IDLatah7/1837IDLemhi6/2968IDLewis7/2419IDLincoln6/2774IDMinidoka7/0164IDNez Perce5/18134IDOneida7/1337IDOwyhee6/12100IDPayette6/1490IDPower7/1535IDShoshone6/2474IDTeton7/2220IDTwin...

Basil Growing Season for Illinois

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonILAdams5/07145ILAlexander4/21177ILBureau5/19127ILCarroll6/0894ILChampaign5/12142ILChristian5/12141ILClay5/17137ILClinton5/03156ILColes5/18136ILCook5/26125ILCrawford5/22130ILDekalb5/27118ILDouglas5/16137ILDupage5/31116ILEdgar5/16139ILEdwards5/02160ILEffingham5/14138ILFord5/21125ILFranklin5/09150ILFulton5/16133ILGreene5/10141ILHamilton5/09145ILHancock5/14133ILHardin5/10140ILHenderson5/15141ILHenry5/16136ILIroquois5/28120ILJackson5/10142ILJasper5/13141ILJefferson5/13141ILJersey5/15135ILJo Daviess5/24117ILKane5/30122ILKnox5/18134ILLa Salle5/20135ILLake6/04114ILLee5/27121ILLivingston5/15141ILLogan5/16136ILMacon5/20130ILMacoupin5/16137ILMadison4/25168ILMarion5/11144ILMarshall5/30120ILMason5/14140ILMassac5/04156ILMchenry6/01111ILMclean5/23128ILMercer5/20131ILMonroe5/06151ILMontgomery5/09145ILMorgan5/21129ILPeoria5/21134ILPerry5/10146ILPope5/10146ILPutnam5/29116ILRandolph5/09146ILRichland5/16138ILRock Island5/23128ILSaline5/09150ILSangamon5/10142ILSchuyler5/19132ILShelby5/12141ILSt....

Basil Growing Season for Indiana

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonINAdams5/17135INAllen5/15138INBartholomew5/11144INBlackford5/19132INBoone5/26126INCarroll5/25123INClark5/18137INClinton5/26127INCrawford6/02113INDaviess5/12140INDecatur5/15137INDelaware5/22126INDubois5/16137INElkhart5/24125INFranklin5/23128INFulton5/25125INGibson5/12149INGrant5/19132INHancock5/15140INHenry5/18134INHoward5/25122INJackson5/14138INJasper5/21133INJay5/22128INJefferson5/14147INJennings5/19134INKosciusko5/30121INLagrange6/01116INLake5/31118INLaporte6/03108INLawrence5/19134INMadison5/16138INMarion5/12142INMartin5/18135INMonroe5/10149INMorgan5/28121INNewton5/22126INOrange5/23126INOwen5/27125INParke5/20137INPerry5/04160INPorter6/03108INPosey4/28164INPulaski5/31125INPutnam5/14142INRandolph5/15134INRush5/17136INScott5/15140INShelby5/15141INSpencer5/15141INSt....

Basil Growing Season for Iowa

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonIAAdair5/13134IAAdams5/22119IAAllamakee5/20127IAAppanoose5/11140IAAudubon5/23117IABenton5/22121IABlack Hawk5/23114IABoone5/16133IABremer5/22122IABuena Vista5/19126IAButler5/20122IACalhoun5/16127IACarroll5/24113IACass5/31104IACedar5/22122IACerro Gordo5/29109IACherokee6/01106IAChickasaw5/23122IAClarke5/15131IAClay5/24115IAClayton5/17133IAClinton5/21127IACrawford5/15132IADallas5/18123IADavis5/12138IADecatur5/09142IADes Moines5/09148IADickinson5/24115IADubuque5/29110IAEmmet5/24116IAFayette5/24118IAFloyd5/26114IAFranklin5/20122IAFremont5/10141IAGreene5/19126IAGrundy5/22119IAGuthrie5/24112IAHamilton5/29109IAHancock5/22120IAHardin5/15132IAHarrison5/20123IAHenry5/19135IAHoward6/04104IAIda5/19119IAIowa5/22121IAJackson5/26115IAJasper5/17121IAJefferson5/17137IAJohnson5/12141IAJones6/03105IAKeokuk5/14138IAKossuth5/18124IALee5/03151IALinn5/16129IALouisa5/20127IALucas5/28113IALyon5/31106IAMadison5/23122IAMahaska5/16134IAMarion5/10143IAMarshall5/19121IAMills5/21122IAMitchell5/18125IAMonona5/19123IAMonroe5/16134IAMontgomery5/18119IAMuscatine5/16130IAO'brien5/20119IAOsceola5/27112IAPage5/17127IAPalo Alto5/17127IAPlymouth5/23116IAPocahontas5/21117IAPolk5/13138IAPottawattamie5/31109IAPoweshiek6/01105IARinggold5/17129IASac5/22119IAScott5/09144IAShelby5/19124IASioux5/27109IAStory5/15125IATama5/26116IATaylor5/18126IAUnion5/17129IAVan...

Basil Growing Season for Kansas

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Kentucky

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Louisiana

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonLAAcadia3/28226LAAllen4/07214LAAscension3/24238LAAssumption3/24238LAAvoyelles4/06213LABeauregard4/18197LACaddo4/17197LACalcasieu3/29228LACameron3/25238LAClaiborne4/16194LADe Soto4/15195LAEast Baton Rouge4/05212LAEast Carroll4/06211LAFranklin4/12192LAIberia3/27231LAIberville3/26234LAJefferson3/27235LAJefferson Davis3/29226LALa Salle4/17182LALafayette3/27230LALafourche3/24244LALincoln4/17189LAMadison4/13198LAMorehouse4/14195LANatchitoches4/09209LAOrleans3/15264LAOuachita4/09200LAPlaquemines3/26234LAPointe Coupee4/05219LARapides4/08211LASabine4/19179LASt. Bernard3/27244LASt. John The Baptist3/27234LASt. Landry4/07211LASt. Mary3/24252LASt....

Basil Growing Season for Maine

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Maryland

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonMDAnne Arundel5/03161MDBaltimore5/08153MDBaltimore (City)5/08153MDDistrict Of Columbia5/07154MDDorchester5/03156MDFrederick5/08152MDGarrett6/2080MDHarford5/07152MDHoward5/28117MDKent5/04154MDMontgomery5/21129MDPrince...

Basil Growing Season for Massachusetts

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Michigan

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonMIAlcona6/15100MIAlger7/0551MIAllegan6/13100MIAlpena6/03108MIArenac6/1389MIBaraga7/2814MIBarry6/13101MIBenzie6/09112MIBerrien5/27133MIBranch5/30112MICalhoun6/11100MICass6/08102MICharlevoix7/1541MICheboygan6/1296MIChippewa6/07105MIClinton6/1296MICrawford7/1636MIDelta6/06109MIDickinson6/2473MIEaton6/1394MIEmmet6/09106MIGenesee6/07109MIGladwin6/2873MIGogebic6/3059MIGratiot6/04109MIHillsdale6/1891MIHoughton7/2617MIHuron6/06114MIIngham6/09103MIIonia6/1299MIIosco6/2084MIIron7/2520MIIsabella6/03113MIJackson6/11108MIKalamazoo6/01118MIKalkaska7/0842MIKent6/02113MILake7/0350MILapeer6/1683MILeelanau6/2571MILenawee6/03111MILivingston6/02113MILuce7/1050MIMacomb5/25131MIManistee6/2080MIMarquette7/0158MIMason6/1492MIMecosta6/1486MIMenominee7/0352MIMidland6/05107MIMissaukee7/2521MIMonroe5/21132MIMontcalm6/1495MIMontmorency7/0154MIMuskegon6/06104MINewaygo7/0262MIOceana7/0262MIOgemaw6/1681MIOntonagon7/0745MIOscoda6/1976MIOtsego7/0455MIOttawa6/11105MIPresque Isle6/1487MIRoscommon7/2521MISaginaw5/27119MISanilac6/04112MISchoolcraft6/1780MIShiawassee6/09104MISt. Clair5/26123MISt. Joseph6/05112MITuscola6/2083MIVan...

Basil Growing Season for Minnesota

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonMNAitkin6/2575MNAnoka6/1294MNBecker6/2655MNBeltrami6/1381MNBig Stone5/22118MNBrown5/28112MNCarlton6/2558MNCarver5/23120MNCass5/30111MNChippewa6/0398MNChisago5/24120MNClay5/3199MNClearwater6/1771MNCook6/1196MNCottonwood5/27110MNCrow Wing6/1881MNDakota5/23122MNDouglas5/21121MNFaribault5/22118MNFillmore6/1680MNFreeborn5/22120MNGoodhue5/29113MNHennepin5/24120MNHouston5/24118MNIsanti6/1096MNItasca6/1674MNKanabec6/3061MNKandiyohi5/24115MNKoochiching6/3056MNLac Qui Parle6/0593MNLake6/16100MNLake Of The Woods6/1677MNLyon5/24117MNMarshall6/0194MNMartin5/17130MNMcleod5/23117MNMeeker5/31109MNMille Lacs6/0899MNMorrison6/0597MNMower5/29108MNNicollet5/26115MNNobles5/27110MNNorman5/29104MNOlmsted6/02109MNOtter Tail5/31111MNPine6/1579MNPipestone6/2372MNPolk6/2565MNPope6/0499MNRamsey5/25123MNRed Lake6/0791MNRedwood5/28108MNRenville5/23117MNRice6/08101MNRock5/29105MNRoseau7/0842MNScott6/0694MNSherburne6/1682MNSibley5/22120MNSt. Louis7/0782MNStearns5/22122MNSteele5/31110MNStevens5/28105MNSwift5/24116MNTodd6/0593MNTraverse5/22117MNWabasha6/1394MNWadena6/0497MNWaseca5/25114MNWashington5/27116MNWatonwan5/26116MNWilkin5/29106MNWinona5/25117MNWright5/24119MNYellow...

Basil Growing Season for Mississippi

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonMSAdams4/16192MSAlcorn4/27166MSAmite4/18184MSAttala4/23171MSBenton4/29162MSCalhoun4/27168MSCarroll4/19184MSChickasaw4/29163MSClaiborne4/18180MSClarke4/23169MSCoahoma4/13195MSCopiah4/15193MSCovington4/15191MSDesoto4/19182MSForrest4/11194MSFranklin4/19183MSGrenada4/21175MSHarrison3/30231MSHinds4/19184MSHolmes4/24170MSHumphreys4/12192MSItawamba5/03160MSJackson4/01218MSJones4/13198MSKemper4/29165MSLafayette5/10144MSLauderdale4/20183MSLawrence4/16180MSLeake4/21175MSLee5/02158MSLeflore4/14197MSLincoln4/18186MSMadison4/19180MSMarion4/14192MSMarshall4/29160MSMonroe4/25178MSMontgomery4/28165MSNeshoba4/20183MSNewton4/22173MSOktibbeha4/20180MSPanola4/25169MSPearl...

Basil Growing Season for Missouri

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonMOAdair5/15135MOAtchison5/13129MOAudrain5/08144MOBarry5/17134MOBarton5/02153MOBates5/16134MOBollinger5/21126MOBoone5/06147MOButler4/27168MOCaldwell5/29113MOCallaway5/09146MOCape Girardeau5/09145MOCarroll5/10139MOCedar5/07149MOChariton5/11135MOChristian5/20140MOClay5/01158MOClinton5/16124MOCole5/10145MOCooper4/29155MOCrawford5/28109MODade5/08148MODaviess5/10147MODekalb5/12135MODent5/15134MODouglas5/08142MODunklin4/24167MOFranklin5/18134MOGreene5/12143MOGrundy5/12137MOHarrison5/17126MOHenry5/12140MOHickory5/13143MOHolt5/08143MOHoward5/09143MOHowell5/10144MOIron5/26127MOJackson5/16131MOJasper5/08145MOJefferson5/17132MOJohnson5/13131MOLaclede5/18132MOLafayette5/09142MOLawrence5/17134MOLewis5/16137MOLincoln5/16135MOLinn5/12142MOMadison5/24118MOMaries5/05149MOMarion5/06149MOMcdonald5/17135MOMercer5/12131MOMiller5/11143MOMississippi4/29159MOMoniteau5/07150MOMonroe5/20126MOMorgan5/13139MONew Madrid4/24167MONewton5/18135MONodaway5/12138MOOregon5/23130MOOsage5/18133MOOzark5/20134MOPemiscot4/24171MOPerry5/16132MOPettis5/17130MOPhelps4/30158MOPike5/25121MOPolk5/20125MOPulaski5/25116MORalls4/28164MORandolph5/04152MOReynolds5/15134MORipley5/18137MOSaline5/12140MOScotland5/17131MOScott4/25169MOShelby5/20126MOSt. Charles5/15133MOSt. Clair5/16137MOSt. Francois5/20129MOSt. Louis5/07150MOSt. Louis...

Basil Growing Season for Montana

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonMTBeaverhead8/012MTBig Horn7/2032MTBlaine6/1771MTBroadwater7/0660MTCarbon7/1246MTCarter7/0158MTCascade8/013MTChouteau7/1048MTCuster6/1482MTDawson5/25107MTFallon6/2564MTFergus7/0266MTFlathead7/0653MTGallatin7/1927MTGarfield6/1591MTGlacier7/2712MTGolden Valley7/1241MTGranite7/298MTHill6/1279MTJefferson7/2031MTJudith Basin7/0359MTLake7/0265MTLewis And Clark6/2271MTLiberty6/2068MTLincolnN/ANo growing season for this area.MTMadison7/2519MTMccone6/2856MTMeagher7/2910MTMineral7/0267MTMissoula8/024MTMusselshell6/0991MTParkN/ANo growing season for this area.MTPetroleum6/2671MTPhillips6/2276MTPondera7/1538MTPowder River6/2379MTPowell7/315MTPrairie6/1775MTRavalliN/ANo growing season for this area.MTRichland6/0498MTRoosevelt6/2662MTRosebud6/2676MTSanders6/2280MTSheridan6/1387MTSilver Bow7/2127MTStillwater7/1547MTSweet...

Basil Growing Season for Nebraska

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNEAdams5/13134NEAntelope6/03104NEArthur6/0799NEBanner6/2968NEBlaine6/03103NEBoone5/23118NEBox Butte6/1097NEBoyd5/19124NEBrown6/06100NEBuffalo5/25118NEBurt5/17128NEButler5/18126NECass5/20122NECedar5/20121NEChase6/07104NECherry6/2177NECheyenne6/1681NEClay5/24117NEColfax5/20121NECuming5/24117NECuster6/04108NEDawes6/03102NEDawson5/26118NEDeuel5/30110NEDixon5/23117NEDodge5/12131NEDouglas5/16129NEDundy5/23121NEFillmore5/13131NEFrontier5/25120NEFurnas5/29115NEGarden6/04104NEGarfield5/24118NEGosper5/19126NEGreeley6/1588NEHall5/17125NEHamilton5/15130NEHarlan5/21124NEHayes5/19123NEHitchcock5/21121NEHolt5/20119NEHoward5/16125NEJefferson5/18128NEJohnson5/20124NEKearney5/18128NEKeith5/22115NEKeya Paha5/25115NEKimball6/1199NEKnox5/22118NELancaster5/15128NELincoln6/02108NEMadison5/26112NEMcpherson6/02107NEMerrick5/13130NEMorrill6/0999NENance5/24115NENemaha5/17128NENuckolls5/17128NEOtoe5/13132NEPawnee5/15136NEPerkins5/24118NEPhelps5/18128NEPierce5/25115NEPlatte5/16128NEPolk5/17124NERed Willow5/20125NERichardson5/14134NERock6/06100NESaline5/15129NESaunders5/17129NEScotts...

Basil Growing Season for Nevada

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNVCarson (City)7/0652NVChurchill6/2677NVClark5/01182NVDouglas7/1342NVElko7/2320NVEsmeralda6/2382NVEureka7/0364NVHumboldt7/1238NVLander7/0942NVLincoln5/27143NVLyon6/1990NVMineral6/04110NVNye5/12153NVPershing6/1886NVStorey6/2087NVWashoe7/0454NVWhite...

Basil Growing Season for New Hampshire

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for New Jersey

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNJAtlantic4/23179NJBurlington5/27117NJCape...

Basil Growing Season for New Mexico

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNMBernalillo5/16151NMCatron7/1259NMChaves5/28119NMCibola6/2975NMColfax6/1796NMCurry5/13142NMDe Baca5/20130NMDona Ana5/24138NMEddy4/24182NMGrant5/23152NMGuadalupe5/16136NMHarding5/29119NMHidalgo5/23150NMLea4/29175NMLincoln7/0661NMLos Alamos6/05111NMLuna4/30174NMMckinley6/2191NMMora6/1890NMOtero5/23134NMQuay5/16135NMRio Arriba5/31122NMRoosevelt5/18132NMSan Juan6/2878NMSan Miguel5/08156NMSandoval7/2711NMSanta...

Basil Growing Season for New York

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNYAlbany6/1483NYAllegany6/2069NYBroome6/04111NYCattaraugus6/2177NYCayuga6/02113NYChautauqua6/2577NYChemung6/09103NYChenango6/1680NYClinton6/1195NYColumbia5/28119NYCortland5/31118NYDelaware6/1688NYDutchess5/28116NYErie6/1986NYEssex7/0451NYFulton6/03108NYGenesee6/02112NYHamilton7/0155NYHerkimer6/1192NYJefferson6/05111NYKings4/21187NYLewis6/1679NYLivingston6/08101NYMadison6/2477NYMonroe5/28120NYNassau5/05160NYNew York4/24187NYOneida5/30114NYOnondaga5/24121NYOntario5/26125NYOrange5/28119NYOrleans6/02117NYOswego5/26126NYOtsego6/1979NYQueens4/19191NYRensselaer6/06105NYSaratoga6/0898NYSt....

Basil Growing Season for North Carolina

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNCAlamance5/01160NCAnson4/24178NCAshe6/1586NCAvery6/07107NCBeaufort4/20185NCBertie5/08153NCBladen5/01171NCBrunswick4/28170NCBuncombe5/18139NCBurke5/06158NCCabarrus5/02164NCCaldwell5/12148NCCarteret4/26186NCChatham5/15144NCCherokee5/26128NCChowan4/20187NCCleveland5/08153NCColumbus5/01170NCCraven4/18186NCCumberland4/30173NCDare4/09227NCDavidson5/10149NCDuplin4/30165NCDurham5/09155NCEdgecombe5/03164NCFranklin5/20131NCGaston5/06164NCGraham5/14146NCGuilford5/02161NCHarnett5/02164NCHaywood6/06108NCHenderson5/14143NCHyde4/26182NCIredell5/17139NCJackson5/25128NCJohnston5/04157NCLenoir5/08158NCLincoln5/07154NCMacon5/28126NCMadison5/24129NCMartin4/26175NCMcdowell5/16142NCMecklenburg4/30173NCMontgomery4/30165NCNew...

Basil Growing Season for North Dakota

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonNDBarnes6/0592NDBenson6/1283NDBillings6/2269NDBottineau6/1862NDBowman6/1484NDBurke6/2663NDBurleigh6/2767NDCass5/29103NDCavalier6/2068NDDickey6/0395NDDivide6/0984NDDunn6/1089NDEddy6/0886NDEmmons6/2469NDFoster6/03101NDGolden Valley6/1581NDGrand...

Basil Growing Season for Ohio

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonOHAllen5/19134OHAshland6/02113OHAshtabula6/1790OHAthens6/05107OHBelmont5/31120OHBrown5/16135OHChampaign5/25128OHClark5/26122OHClermont5/17141OHClinton5/13135OHColumbiana6/1687OHCoshocton5/27121OHCrawford5/21129OHCuyahoga5/27128OHDarke5/21122OHDefiance5/19133OHDelaware5/27126OHErie5/08157OHFayette5/13142OHFranklin5/13138OHFulton5/21131OHGallia5/22131OHGeauga6/16102OHGreene5/19127OHGuernsey5/29123OHHamilton5/11147OHHancock5/16137OHHardin5/24127OHHarrison5/23131OHHighland5/14141OHHolmes5/31117OHHuron5/26125OHJackson5/28119OHJefferson5/24134OHKnox5/23126OHLake5/16149OHLicking5/26122OHLogan5/20129OHLorain6/04108OHLucas5/29119OHMadison5/27122OHMarion5/24124OHMedina6/04108OHMeigs6/01117OHMercer5/18131OHMontgomery5/06153OHMorgan5/29122OHMuskingum6/02117OHPaulding5/25122OHPerry5/30117OHPickaway5/19134OHPike5/26124OHPortage5/27130OHPreble5/25125OHPutnam5/17133OHRichland6/05111OHSandusky5/17135OHScioto5/15132OHSeneca5/17135OHSummit5/26134OHTrumbull6/11106OHTuscarawas6/01119OHUnion5/21131OHVan...

Basil Growing Season for Oklahoma

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonOKAdair5/08149OKAlfalfa5/02160OKBeaver5/14138OKBeckham5/06150OKBlaine4/28163OKBryan4/23177OKCaddo5/03154OKCanadian4/27162OKCarter4/17195OKCherokee5/07149OKChoctaw4/16190OKCimarron5/19130OKCleveland4/29167OKComanche4/28166OKCotton4/26170OKCraig5/05150OKCreek5/02157OKCuster4/26167OKDelaware4/30158OKDewey5/09146OKEllis5/06151OKGarfield4/26172OKGarvin4/29169OKGrady4/27165OKGrant5/07152OKGreer4/28165OKHarmon4/25167OKHarper5/13142OKHaskell4/26163OKHughes4/24168OKJackson4/25169OKJefferson4/21178OKKay5/05158OKKingfisher5/04161OKKiowa4/23170OKLatimer5/01153OKLincoln4/30157OKLogan5/03156OKLove4/17187OKMarshall4/18189OKMayes5/06146OKMcclain5/02163OKMccurtain4/21174OKMcintosh4/24168OKMuskogee4/26167OKNoble4/29163OKNowata4/28160OKOkfuskee4/16186OKOklahoma4/21179OKOkmulgee4/28154OKOsage5/05153OKOttawa5/04148OKPawnee5/06152OKPayne4/18180OKPittsburg4/26171OKPontotoc4/17181OKPushmataha4/24170OKRoger...

Basil Growing Season for Oregon

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonORBaker6/10111ORBenton6/01120ORClackamas6/2289ORClatsop5/27129ORColumbia6/3059ORCoos6/01121ORCrook7/2718ORCurry5/03204ORDeschutes7/2618ORDouglas5/26128ORGilliam7/1354ORGrantN/ANo growing season for this area.ORHarney7/1541ORHood River6/07104ORJackson7/2420ORJefferson8/022ORJosephine6/2083ORKlamath7/2323ORLake7/0748ORLane5/29122ORLincoln6/06132ORLinn6/2577ORMalheur7/2227ORMarion5/23151ORMorrow6/1595ORMultnomah5/10152ORPolk6/16102ORSherman7/0668ORTillamook6/08126ORUmatillaN/ANo growing season for this...

Basil Growing Season for Pennsylvania

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Rhode Island

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for South Carolina

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for South Dakota

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonSDAurora5/25115SDBeadle6/02104SDBennett6/1492SDBon Homme5/19122SDBrookings6/0596SDBrown5/28104SDBuffalo5/31103SDButte6/0398SDCampbell5/29107SDCharles Mix5/19122SDClark5/28112SDClay5/22115SDCodington6/0399SDCorson6/0794SDCuster7/0551SDDavison5/25115SDDay6/02104SDDeuel5/30107SDDewey6/02105SDDouglas5/21118SDEdmunds6/1683SDFall...

Basil Growing Season for Tennessee

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Texas

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonTXAnderson4/14201TXAndrews4/21188TXAngelina4/16194TXAransas3/14261TXArcher4/16183TXArmstrong5/16142TXAtascosa4/12210TXAustin3/30223TXBailey5/14139TXBandera4/20183TXBastrop4/26177TXBaylor4/26173TXBee4/02228TXBell4/12204TXBexar4/07214TXBlanco4/19189TXBorden4/18183TXBosque4/15201TXBowie4/14196TXBrazoria3/24247TXBrazos4/09214TXBrewster4/05218TXBriscoe5/12150TXBrooks3/27239TXBrown4/22183TXBurleson4/11208TXBurnet4/16192TXCaldwell4/16201TXCalhoun3/18253TXCallahan4/17194TXCameron3/08287TXCarson5/14143TXCastro5/16137TXChambers3/25236TXCherokee4/15209TXChildress4/21178TXClay4/23176TXCochran5/10153TXCoke4/18192TXColeman4/13196TXCollin4/13199TXCollingsworth4/22179TXColorado4/15199TXComal4/12211TXComanche4/16198TXConcho4/22179TXCoryell4/19190TXCottle4/21179TXCrane4/20189TXCrockett4/29173TXCrosby4/30172TXCulberson4/27179TXDallam5/14142TXDallas4/09217TXDawson4/27172TXDeaf Smith5/13143TXDenton4/11204TXDewitt4/12208TXDickens4/25172TXDimmit3/26235TXDonley5/10147TXDuval4/05224TXEastland4/17190TXEctor4/21182TXEdwards4/17193TXEl Paso4/21186TXEllis4/12204TXErath4/14199TXFalls4/17197TXFannin4/17183TXFayette4/04224TXFisher4/22182TXFloyd5/04157TXFort Bend3/28227TXFranklin4/15192TXFreestone4/16199TXFrio3/26237TXGaines4/27174TXGalveston3/04281TXGarza4/22180TXGillespie4/20189TXGlasscock5/01169TXGoliad4/10209TXGonzales4/02222TXGray5/05158TXGrayson4/14193TXGregg4/18188TXHale4/30169TXHall4/25173TXHamilton4/15205TXHansford5/12146TXHardeman4/26166TXHarris3/26245TXHarrison4/15189TXHartley5/11149TXHaskell4/16194TXHays4/10211TXHemphill5/07150TXHenderson4/16189TXHidalgo3/09279TXHill4/17196TXHockley5/04159TXHopkins4/16187TXHouston4/15202TXHoward4/20192TXHudspeth5/10153TXHunt4/22182TXHutchinson5/09149TXJack4/14198TXJasper4/20185TXJeff Davis5/03159TXJefferson3/28227TXJim Hogg3/28239TXJim Wells3/20252TXJohnson4/16196TXJones4/14193TXKaufman4/17194TXKendall4/22183TXKent4/22174TXKimble5/03163TXKing4/26166TXKinney4/14196TXKleberg3/28238TXKnox4/17182TXLa Salle3/31227TXLamar4/14198TXLamb5/07150TXLampasas4/26174TXLavaca4/03218TXLee4/08212TXLeon4/19188TXLiberty4/01218TXLimestone4/11204TXLipscomb5/16136TXLlano4/19192TXLubbock4/23175TXLynn4/26174TXMadison4/14206TXMarion4/17180TXMason4/22182TXMatagorda3/24243TXMaverick3/26236TXMcculloch4/16198TXMclennan4/12208TXMcmullen4/03224TXMenard5/07158TXMidland4/18186TXMilam4/13209TXMills4/17196TXMitchell5/01172TXMontague4/15199TXMontgomery4/06217TXMoore5/12149TXMorris4/12205TXMotley4/23185TXNavarro4/15200TXNolan4/25177TXNueces3/22250TXOchiltree5/15139TXOldham5/12143TXPalo Pinto4/18198TXPanola4/17188TXParker4/22175TXParmer5/14146TXPecos4/21182TXPolk4/18187TXPotter5/12148TXPresidio4/16198TXRains4/19187TXRandall5/09150TXReagan4/24171TXReal4/20188TXRed River4/18183TXReeves4/24180TXRoberts5/10146TXRobertson4/12206TXRunnels4/22182TXRusk4/17193TXSan Jacinto4/14202TXSan Patricio3/26241TXSan Saba4/17188TXScurry4/26176TXShackelford4/25175TXShelby4/18183TXSherman5/17135TXSomervell5/07148TXStarr3/30231TXStephens4/24184TXSterling5/02159TXStonewall4/27169TXSutton4/26166TXSwisher5/11150TXTarrant4/12209TXTaylor4/19193TXTerrell4/15192TXTerry4/28173TXTitus4/22169TXTom Green4/17188TXTravis3/29232TXTrinity4/14194TXTyler4/12204TXUpshur4/18181TXUpton4/16196TXVal Verde3/28230TXVan...

Basil Growing Season for Utah

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonUTBeaver6/2779UTBox Elder7/1236UTCache6/2863UTDaggett6/2663UTDavis6/03111UTDuchesne6/1984UTEmery6/04111UTGarfield7/1433UTGrand5/16133UTIron7/1042UTJuab6/2285UTKane5/30122UTMillard7/0461UTMorgan7/0350UTPiute7/0358UTRich7/307UTSalt Lake7/308UTSan...

Basil Growing Season for Vermont

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonVTAddison6/1392VTCaledonia6/1782VTChittenden6/02111VTFranklin6/2471VTGrand...

Basil Growing Season for Virginia

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonVAAccomack5/07159VAAlbemarle4/28168VAAlleghany6/01118VAAmelia5/13142VAAppomattox5/13143VAArlington4/20185VAAugusta5/31119VABath6/02115VABedford5/12149VABotetourt5/19138VABrunswick5/19136VABuchanan5/19141VACampbell5/16134VACaroline5/21137VACarroll6/02113VACharlotte5/19136VACumberland5/13145VAFairfax5/12168VAFauquier5/17141VAFloyd6/1190VAFluvanna5/17140VAFranklin5/17139VAFrederick5/27118VAGiles6/02116VAHampton4/17194VAHanover5/13144VAHenrico5/07160VAHenry5/26128VAKing And Queen5/13144VAKing William5/08149VALee5/29116VALoudoun5/21129VALouisa5/24127VAMadison6/1691VAMathews4/28172VAMecklenburg5/11151VAMontgomery6/01111VANelson5/14144VANew Kent5/08149VANorfolk (City)4/19191VAOrange5/11148VAPage6/01118VAPatrick5/14146VAPittsylvania5/04161VAPrince George5/05160VAPulaski6/06112VARichmond5/07154VARoanoke5/14140VARockbridge6/06112VARockingham5/26122VAShenandoah5/19126VASmyth6/10101VASuffolk5/04155VASussex5/12145VATazewell6/2378VAVirginia...

Basil Growing Season for Washington

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonWAAdams6/2182WABenton5/11153WAChelan5/15139WAClallam6/06103WAClark6/06105WAColumbia6/04111WACowlitz5/27137WADouglas5/15139WAFerry7/1044WAFranklin6/01110WAGarfield6/1392WAGrant5/28122WAGrays Harbor6/09107WAIsland5/22133WAJefferson6/1989WAKing6/07114WAKitsap5/11158WAKittitas6/1785WAKlickitat5/16137WALewis6/2877WALincoln7/0850WAOkanogan6/2185WAPacific6/2580WAPend Oreille7/2036WAPierce8/032WASan Juan5/10164WASkagit5/19123WASkamania7/1242WASnohomish6/02115WASpokane6/09103WAStevens6/2872WAThurston6/1589WAWalla...

Basil Growing Season for West Virginia

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing...

Basil Growing Season for Wisconsin

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonWIAshland6/2959WIBarron6/1879WIBayfield7/0253WIBrown6/06110WIBuffalo5/26122WIBurnett6/1588WICalumet6/06110WIChippewa6/08104WIClark6/2473WIColumbia6/08102WICrawford5/27120WIDane6/03110WIDodge6/02108WIDoor6/10108WIDouglas7/0641WIDunn6/1098WIEau Claire6/1197WIFond Du Lac5/25129WIForest7/0156WIGrant5/30111WIGreen6/06104WIGreen Lake6/1397WIIowa6/07106WIIron6/2959WIJackson6/1487WIJefferson6/07103WIJuneau6/1093WIKenosha5/26128WIKewaunee6/08107WILa...

Basil Growing Season for Wyoming

The NOAA National Climatic Data Center provides information to the public about spring and fall frost dates in the United States and the length of the expected growing season for each area. These statistics are calculated using data collected from 1971 to 2000, across 4300 weather stations located in every part of the country. While informative, the statistics that NOAA provides is overwhelming. So, we took the liberty of extracting the most basic information that we feel would be useful to someone interested in growing basil outdoors. The table below lists the date after which it should be safe to plant basil outdoors in each area of the state. This information is based on NOAA’s calculations for a 10% probability of temperatures falling below 36 degrees Fahrenheit. This means that, on average, there is only a 10% chance that you will see frost after this date. Also listed is the estimated length of the growing season. This is how many days you can expect to have before the risk of frost is greater than 10%. Please use this information at your own risk. You must take into consideration many varying factors, for example, micro-climates or the presence of valleys and bodies of water, to determine your actual growing season. StateCountyLast Frost DateLength of Growing SeasonWYAlbany7/1727WYBig Horn6/1388WYCampbell7/0461WYCarbon6/3054WYConverse6/1885WYCrook6/2472WYFremont6/1986WYGoshen6/1971WYHot Springs6/1981WYJohnson7/0166WYLaramie6/1686WYLincoln7/2612WYNatrona6/2672WYNiobrara7/0658WYPark7/2814WYPlatte7/0747WYSheridan7/0752WYSubletteN/ANo growing season for this area.WYSweetwater7/1334WYTetonN/ANo growing season for this area.WYUinta7/1930WYWashakie6/3059WYWeston7/0358WYYellowstone National ParkN/ANo growing season for this...